Prague

When I first thought about studying abroad–even before I got to college–I would never have guessed I would end up studying in Prague. Honestly, the only reason I ended up coming here to study was because it was the only intensive film studies program abroad to which my college was connected, but now that I’ve been here almost two days I can say that I am glad this was where my studies directed me. It’s not just because I enjoyed the beer at Kozlovna tonight or because I am intrigued by the city’s open imperfections that contrast its beautiful and intricate architecture. Instead, I am glad to have decided to explore a culture that I would not otherwise have learned much about from my cultural cave in the United States.

Last night at dinner, a group was discussing what Czech people thought about Americans and what Americans thought of Czech people. While I found the response of my fellow U.S. citizens to the latter discussion superficial, it did make me consider the fact that I know very little about the Czech Republic and its people–so little that I had few preconceived notions of what they were like. This, of course, is not entirely bad. The reality is no one can know something about everything (though too many of us seek to prove otherwise), but in general, I feel that the rich history of the Czech Republic is overlooked as lesser to that of other states, especially those in Western Europe.

There are so many things the Czech Republic has to offer–historically, culturally, and otherwise. It’s a beautiful city in itself (pictures will come — I’ve decided to not carry my camera around until I’m slightly better acquainted with the city), but there are also many interesting stories in its far and recent past, including the Velvet Revolution, after which Václav Havel–the namesake of Prague’s international airport–is named, and the films of the well-known Miloš Forman and other Czech directors and their involvement in the Czechoslovak New Wave film movement.

I won’t go into all of it here, but if you’re interested in European history or culture (especially film) I would highly recommend you spend some time reading up on it. What I’ve listed here are pretty important to Czech history but feel free to explore it further.

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